I Just Want to Go to Bed! But I’ve Come to Depend on at Least Ten Minutes of Fitness for Sleeping Well

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Locked Up the Car and Walked Away for Five Minutes

I got home just before 11pm after a long, productive day and all I wanted to do was to get upstairs and go to bed. Great thesis work in the company of a great friend and colleague kept my focus off fitness, but I’ve come to depend on a feeling of satisfaction from at least ten minutes of fitness a day. This satisfaction has become a noticeable part of finding my calm, finding sleep, and preventing insomnia. It’s not even midnight and I’m pleasantly unwinding, looking forward to sleep.

Before heading up the stairs, I left my things and locked up the car and walked away from the house for five minutes. Don’t worry, I came back.

Goodnight.

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Don’t Let the Pendulum Hit You in the Ass On Your Way Out the Door

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Honor the Tired

When I make a change in my life, I  MAKE A CHANGE LIKE YOU’VE NEVER SEEN BEFORE! Until the pendulum swings back and knocks me into the behavior I had changed. Or worse.

When I made the change to count Weight Watchers’ points I counted points LIKE YOU’VE NEVER SEEN BEFORE! And then the pendulum swung back and knocked me into emotionally eating more than before. I weighed more than when I’d started the program. I slowly learned to push the pendulum back; slowly, realistically lost weight again. After my WW meeting space changed and my favorite leader quit, I lost my personal connection to the program and left. While still overweight and under healthed, I am better at keeping the pendulum away from extremes.

Five days ago I decided to exercise like my quality of life depended on it and I excersized LIKE YOU’VE NEVER SEEN BEFORE! For an overweight and out of shape body.

It’s day six and I’m tired. I babysat this morning. Tired. I had an anxiety attack. Tired. I did some intellectually challenging writing. Tired. Look at that face. Tired.

I don’t want the pendulum to hit me in the ass on my way out the door. So I took a slow, relaxing, and reflective 30 minute evening walk.

Honor the tired.